Greenwich Synagogue To Move Forward After Unanimous Approval Of Plan

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The plans for a proposed synagogue on Orchard Street in Greenwich are moving forward after receiving unanimous approval from the Planning and Zoning Commission.
The plans for a proposed synagogue on Orchard Street in Greenwich are moving forward after receiving unanimous approval from the Planning and Zoning Commission. Photo Credit: Courtesy of Greenwich Reform Synagogue

GREENWICH, Conn. -- The Greenwich Planning and Zoning Commission unanimously approved the preliminary plans for a proposed synagogue on Orchard Street in Cos Cob at a meeting Tuesday, according to a spokesman for Greenwich Reform Synagogue.

Greenwich Reform Synagogue has filed plans with the Town of Greenwich to build its synagogue on a 1.75-acre site on Orchard Street in Cos Cob. The proposed building will be 2.5 stories, housing a sanctuary, classrooms and offices in a little under 12,300 square feet of space.

Residents neighboring the Orchard Street property have been vocal in their opposition to the proposed building since plans became public in late 2012 and sued the town. They have argued that the building would cause traffic problems and raised concerns about drainage and runoff from the proposed parking lot.

Greenwich Reform Synagogue received unanimous approval from the town's Inland Wetlands & Watercourses Agency on Feb. 3, which maintained that the parking lot would not affect wetlands and drainage.

Greenwich Reform Synagogue representatives will next appear before the Zoning Board of Appeals to request a special exception, which is the normal process for building a religious institution in a residential zone. Greenwich Reform Synagogue will then head to the Greenwich Architectural Review Committee for a meeting that has not yet been scheduled.

Following that, Greenwich Reform Synagogue will once again appear in front of the Planning & Zoning Commission with a final site plan. At that time, an official and final decision is expected to be rendered.

The building will be only the second purpose-built synagogue constructed in the town’s 374-year history.

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