Greenwich Likely To Escape Brunt Of Latest Storm

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For the first time in weeks, the ground is visible below the snow.
For the first time in weeks, the ground is visible below the snow. Photo Credit: Zak Failla

FAIRFIELD COUNTY, Conn. – Although an ominous weather forecast had a snowstorm headed straight for Fairfield County to open the workweek, Mother Nature appears to have spared us.

Fairfield County is now expected to receive only flurries late Sunday and into Monday from the edge of the quick-moving system.

As of Sunday night, forecasts were calling for a dusting to 2 inches accumulation in the northern part of the county and 2 to 4 inches for the southern part. No advisories or warnings were put into effect for Fairfield County by the National Weather Service.

Last week, meteorologists were predicting another massive snowstorm would touch down in Fairfield County, perhaps dumping more than a foot of powder in the area. Unexpectedly, the storm cell tracked farther south, with the bulk of snow headed for Philadelphia and Washington, D.C., the National Weather Service said.

After a brief dusting overnight, there is just a 50 percent chance of snow Monday morning, with the sun coming out by the afternoon. High temperatures will be in the 20s, more than 20 degrees below the usual average high temperature for early March in Fairfield County. 

Icy temperatures will return Monday night, dipping into the single digits into Tuesday morning.  

In Eastchester, N.Y., Paul McDonald, still weary of the forecast, was breaking down a mound of ice that had built up outside of his home, “just in case.”

“With the way this winter has gone, I’m not taking any chances. It’s been brutal so far,” he said. “I’d rather spend a half-hour out here while it’s moderately warm than fall all over the place when it snows again.”

While homeowners are celebrating the sight of their lawns for the first time in weeks, business owners were similarly happy as the accumulated snow and ice melted away from sidewalks and storefronts, allowing for safer parking and shopping.

“Ice and snow mean a lot of extra work. You have to shovel and ice and usually it’s slower,” said Sanju Kanam, who owns several beverage dispensaries in Westchester County. “This one sounded bad, but so far, it’s just been really gray.”

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